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COMPARISON BETWEEN FEASIBIITY OF HIGH SPEED RAIL & ELECTROMAGNETIC RAIL IN BANGLADESH(PART-3)

ABOUT DIFFERENT TYPES OF R AIL
 

1. COMMUTER RAIL



  Commuter rail or suburban rail is a passenger rail transport service between a city center, and outer suburbs and commuter towns or other locations that draw large numbers of commuters—people who travel on a daily basis that operates on existing freight railroad tracks.



Trains run inbound to the city center in the morning and run outbound service to home areas in the evening.





The general range of commuter trains varies between 15 and 200 km (10 and 125 miles)
  Figure-01
Top speed- Speed 50 to 200 km/h (35 to 125 mph).


Cost- $ 3-10 million a mile.

2. LIGHT RAIL

  


Figure-02
Light rail is defined as an electric railway with a 'light volume' traffic capacity compared to heavy rail. Light in this context is used in the sense of "intended for light loads and fast movement.

Powered from an overhead wire, LRT can run on exclusive, semi-exclusive or shared alignments, with or without grade crossings, or even in traffic lanes on city streets.


Stations typically are 0.5-1.5 miles apart and rail service operates about 20 hours a day.


LRT corridors are usually 10-20 miles long.


Top Speed – 106  kmph (66 mph).


Costs - $15 -100 million per mile.
 
3. HIGH SPEED RAIL
 

Figure-03
  High speed rail is a generic name for a family of technologies, both steel-wheel on rail & magnetic levitation (maglev) systems


This rail is time competitive with air and auto for travel markets in the approximate range of 100 to 500 miles.


Top Speed - 145kmph (90mph) for steel wheel to 485kmph (300mph) for maglev.


Cost - $ 3-80 million /mile depending on technology.
In France $ 15.1 million/km.

4. ELECTROMAGNETIC RAIL
  

Figure-04
 A Magnet train is that floats on a magnetic field and is propelled by a linear induction motor. They follow guidance tracks with magnets. These trains are often referred to as Magnetically Levitated trains, which are abbreviated to Maglev. But maglevs don't use steel wheel on steel rail usually associated with trains.

Top speed- 581 km/h in Japan (Yr-2003)


Cost- The Shanghai maglev cost 9.93 billion Yuan (US$1.2 billion) to build.


-Low-speed maglev (100 km/h) cost approximately US$100 million/km.


HISTORY OF HIGH SPEED RAIL


Information Chronology of High speed rail Transportation Technology in the world-


1933 - used in Europe and the United States as streamlined trains for high speed services to 130 km/h (80 mph)( average speed ) and 160 km/h (100 mph)( top speed).


1939 - Used in the Italian ETR 200 as first high speed service train to 203 km/h (average speed).


July 1939 - used in The Italian ETR 200 as the first high speed train at 165 km/h (top speed).


1957 - Launched the Odakyu Electric Railway in Greater Tokyo as narrow gauge trains at 145 km/h (90 mph).


October 1964 - officially opened the world's first contemporary "high-speed train" in Japan at speeds of 200 km/h (125 mph).


HISTORY OF ELECTROMAGNETIC RAIL


Information Chronology of Maglev Transportation Technology in the world-


1934 – 1977 from the idea to the system decision


1978 – 1991 from the test facility to technical readiness for application


1992 – 2000 the first application in Germany is planned


2000 – 2003 Alternative routes in Germany and abroad

2004 - …First commercial operation


29 December, 2003 - The world's first commercial Transrapid route starts scheduled operation in Shanghai.


July 3, 2004 - SMTDC welcomes its one – millionth passenger on the world's first commercial Transrapid route in Shanghai.

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